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Webinars

Professional Development and Learning (PD&L) Series

The McDonald Institute is pleased to present the (online) Professional Development and Learning Series for affiliated students and fellows. This series aims to enhance the professional skill sets of our highly qualified personnel in support of their diverse career trajectories. Weekly workshops are free to attend and focus on a wide variety of topics including academic and non-academic skills promotion, entrepreneurship, and equity in research. 

Please email Alexandra Pedersen for more information.

Upcoming Sessions

Tuesday June 2, 2020: 1:30pm-2:30pm EDT

Teaching Dossiers: An Essential Tool

Developing a Teaching Dossier is a great way to reflect on your teaching views, approaches, experiences, and evaluations. Creating and editing these documents is a great way to assess your own teaching, reflect on your pedagogical processes, and identify where you see room for improvement. Sections of a teaching dossier include a biographical overview, teaching philosophy statement, teaching strategies, experiences, teaching effectiveness (evaluations and feedback), professional development, scholarship, leadership, awards, sample syllabi, and more. A teaching dossier is ever-evolving, similar to a curriculum vitae or resume, however it is distinct as it focuses on current goals and relevant experiences and examples in teaching and learning within its typical 6-12 pages length. Join the McDonald Institute in welcoming members of the Queen’s University Centre for Teaching and Learning as they guide us through the basics of what is needed to complete a Teaching Dossier in preparation for your career.

Presenters:

Nevena Martinović, Educational Development Associate, CT&L

Nevena Martinović, Educational Development Associate, CT&L

Nevena Martinović is an Educational Development Associate with the Queen’s University Centre for Teaching and Learning. She is passionate about writing in all of its forms and is excited to use her experience as a teaching fellow and teaching assistant in her work at the Centre for Teaching and Learning.

Yasmine Djerbal, Educational Development Associate, CT&L

Yasmine Djerbal, Educational Development Associate, CT&L

Yasmine Djerbal is an Educational Development Associate with the Queen’s University Centre for Teaching and Learning. Yasmine hopes to use her experience as an international student to support fellow international TA’s and TF’s, and more generally support folks committed to anti-racist and decolonial pedagogies in their teaching practices. Yasmine has experience as a teaching assistant (TA), lead TA, and teaching fellow in gender studies. She also has as experience in syllabus & tutorial design, and individual teaching support for graduate student and post-docs.

Please register HERE.

Stay up to date with new sessions

Previous Sessions

Tuesday March 31, 2020 – 1pm – 2pm EDT

Competitive Presentations (online edition): Now that we all need to work online, how do we make our presentations more effective? Ed Thomas has adapted his 2019 seminar on competitive presentation practices to deal with online meetings. Please join in to review basic rules of narration, framing, complexity and visual communications. The 60-minute session will provide ample opportunities for questions and answers.

Presenter: Edward Thomas is the Associate Director of External Relations at the McDonald Institute. He leads partnerships, communications and business development within the Institute, the broader astroparticle physics community, academia, government, business, NGOs and the Canadian public. He has more than 20 years of experience in technology development, research administration, innovation support and business journalism.

 

Tuesday April 7, 2020 – 1:30pm-2:30pm EDT

Skills Development: Individuals will use the new Queen’s Skills Cards to assess their proficiency in and enjoyment of 35 transferable skills, as well as the relevance of these skills to their target roles. Individuals will be invited to brainstorm specific examples of their skills in action, which can then be used in cover letters and in interviews.

Presenter: Carli Fink, Career Counsellor at Queen’s University Career Services, has dedicated her professional life to supporting students’ development, wellness, and success. Carli has served in various student services roles at universities, colleges, and high schools in Canada and the US. Her greatest joy at work lies in helping students realize the personal meaning and professional power of their educational experiences. At Queen’s Career Services, she has the opportunity to do this through career counselling appointments, workshops, and by leading the Queen’s Skills Cards project as well as the Resume Coach program.

 

Tuesday April 14, 2020 - 1:30pm – 3:00pm EDT

Resumes/CV/Cover letters: Individuals will learn strategies to stand out as an applicant and will begin to revise their own resume/CV to demonstrate maximum “match” with their goals. Individuals will learn strategies to stand out as an applicant and will begin to revise their own cover letter(s) to demonstrate maximum “match” with their goals.

Presenter:  Carli Fink, Career Counsellor at Queen’s University Career Services, has dedicated her professional life to supporting students’ development, wellness, and success. Carli has served in various student services roles at universities, colleges, and high schools in Canada and the US. Her greatest joy at work lies in helping students realize the personal meaning and professional power of their educational experiences. At Queen’s Career Services, she has the opportunity to do this through career counselling appointments, workshops, and by leading the Queen’s Skills Cards project as well as the Resume Coach program.

 

Tuesday April 21, 2020 - 1:30pm 2:30pm

Lean Startups: An Innovation Model that Works for Entrepreneurs AND Scientists: “Innovation” is an overused word. It really means nothing more than using knowledge to create tangible value. Lean Startup was developed to meet the needs of first-time entrepreneurs; those setting out to change with the world with limited money, limited time, and uncertain assumptions. Understanding the Lean model is especially useful for scientists and engineers who imagine beneficial uses for their expertise outside of research, but who rely on outside entrepreneurs and investors to make things happen. This session is also useful for post-graduate researchers thinking of careers in industry, as we borrow heavily from the Lean Management and Agile frameworks employed by leading tech companies.

MOTIVATION: In early March, the Italian researchers of the Global Argon Dark Matter Collaboration found themselves in the middle of a global COVID-19 hot zone, Prof. Cristiano Galbiati recognized an opportunity to combat the crisis by using the community’s expertise in prototyping precision gas flow equipment to address a dire shortage of clinical ventilators around the world. Several hundred scientists, physicians, engineers, technicians, business developers and regulators from more than 50 organizations in Italy, Canada, the United States and Europe have since joined in the Mechanical Ventilator Milano (MVM) collaboration. The Canadian group, coordinated by Dr. Art McDonald, includes TRIUMF, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, SNOLAB, Queen’s and U of T. In one month, MVM has built and demonstrated its open source design and developed an international partnership of manufacturers preparing to rapidly build and deliver tens of thousands of units. This rapid transfer of knowledge and know-how from the research and medical world to the manufacturing sector is an excellent example of innovation at work.

Presenter: Edward Thomas — a McDonald Institute officer and former startup adviser, engineering researcher and business journalist — is offering this seminar on a widely adopted methodology for scalable innovations that uses scientific methods.

 

Tuesday April 28, 2020:  1:30pm-2:30pm EDT

Interview strategies: Individuals will learn common types of interview questions (i.e., introductions, behavioural questions, and weaknesses) and strategies for answering them effectively, as well as consider what types of questions to ask at the end of an interview. In the 90-minute option, individuals will also gain confidence through practicing common interview scenarios.

Presenter: Jenny Lee Northey is currently a career counsellor at Queen’s Career Services supporting post-secondary students in their career development. With over 10 years of experience working in the education, career, and employment sectors, she has also previously worked internationally in various roles in postsecondary institutions. Jenny integrates her background in intercultural communication, equity, diversity and inclusion, empowering individuals in their next steps forward in their career.

 

Tuesday May 5, 2020: 1:30pm – 2:30pm EDT

LinkedIn Session #1: Building your Profile: Individuals learn about the purpose of LinkedIn and how to make decisions around designing their own online profile so that it is targeted and relevant for their career goals.

Requirements to attend: Participants must register for a LinkedIn account ahead of time.

Presenter: Josh Zettel is a career counsellor at Queen’s University’s Career Services. Two years ago, he completed his Master’s in Counseling from Adler University in Chicago with a specialization in Sport and Health Psychology. He has experience working in a wide variety of work settings, connected with people from diverse backgrounds, and can support you in identifying and achieving career aspirations that are meaningful to you. He is here to help you refine your LinkedIn Profile so that it reflects you, builds your LinkedIn Network, and can be found by relevant recruiters. Feel free to check out his LinkedIn profile to prepare questions about specifics regarding the use of LinkedIn and to find out more about his career story!

 

Tuesday May 12, 2020: 1:30pm – 2:30pm EDT

LinkedIn Session #2: Networking Strategies: Students will explore the capabilities of LinkedIn for researching careers and experience how it can support career decision-making and job search, particularly through networking. Discuss common questions such as: “What do I put in a message when reaching out to someone?” or “How do I find alumni to talk with?” or “How can I get someone to respond to my message without bugging them?”

Requirements to attend: Participants must register for a LinkedIn account ahead of time. You do not need to have attended LinkedIn Session #1, but it is a benefit!

Presenter: Jenny Lee Northey is currently a career counsellor at Queen’s Career Services supporting post-secondary students in their career development. With over 10 years of experience working in the education, career, and employment sectors, she has also previously worked internationally in various roles in postsecondary institutions. Jenny integrates her background in intercultural communication, equity, diversity and inclusion, empowering individuals in their next steps forward in their career.

 

Tuesday May 19, 2020: 1:30pm – 3:00pm EDT

Managing Complex Research — Tasks, Projects and Portfolio Strategies:

Science is a social enterprise. Its progress depends on the mutual obligation of multiple actors working in coordination towards commonly held goals. This means that as science gets “bigger” the demands for coordination, organization and management know-how increases over time. This talk is organized to introduce post-graduate students to simple project management methods and strategies using a single tool (Trello, with a few add-ons). All of the content of the talk can be easily implemented in a wide range of similar tools (Post-It notes, MS Project, Jira, Wrike, Monday, Favro, etc.). This presentation introduces project organization and planning at three scales: individual tasks, projects (collections of functionally related tasks) and portfolios (collections of projects). At each scale, it identifies essential things you would need to efficiently manage teams and it introduces several ways of securing this knowledge with the least amount of effort, possible.

It is still exceptional in natural sciences education to suggest that business skills like finance, project management and recruiting/marketing are going to be determinant career factors. But much of science, and most of astroparticle physics research, requires large teams of people to collaborate on multifaceted, time-sensitive tasks across multiple and often interdependent projects. Research careers increasingly require us to learn a few things about project management — acquiring these skills is a key step in preparing yourself for leadership positions in scientific research. We need to spend a bit of time developing a mental model of how we should try and organize, as well as gaining practical skill in using organizational tools and methods.

Key Concepts: Task Lists (Binning); Agile Workflows & Kanban; Phase-Gate Workflows & Critical Paths (Gantt Charts); Horizontal, Vertical & Hybrid Project Teams; Task, Project & Portfolio Resources

Presenter: Edward Thomas — a McDonald Institute officer and former startup adviser, engineering researcher and business journalist — is offering this seminar on a widely adopted methodology for scalable innovations that uses scientific methods.

 

Tuesday May 26, 2020: 1:30-3:30pm EDT

Positive Space

The Positive Space program with Jean Pfleiderer (Associate Director, Human Rights Advisory Services): In celebration of 20 years of the Positive Space program at Queen’s University, we are excited to have Jean Pfleiderer join the McDonald Institute for one of the first-ever-delivery of Positive Space online. Participants who complete the program at Queen’s receive a sticker to indicate they have completed the workshop and uphold the program mandate. Positive Space stickers in work, living, or study areas signal that all are welcome. To be welcoming includes not making assumptions about anyone’s gender or sexual orientation, being aware of intersectionalities with other forms of oppression, and working to overcome both overt and subtle forms of discrimination and harassment. Join the McDonald Institute in learning how to make your research group, work space, or lab more inclusive.